New Jersey Property Owners Can Now Contest a Spill Lien on Their Property

New administrative guidance has been released to clearly define the Spill Act Lien and outline the procedures for property owners to contest a lien. The Spill Compensation and Control Act, N.J.S.A. 58:10-23.11F, also known as the Spill Act Lien, was put in place to compensate the State of New Jersey for any monies spent cleaning up contaminated properties. 

These liens can be levied against property owners, not only on the contaminated properties but also on any other property they own in New Jersey. Once the state has decided to move forward with the lien, the property owner(s) are notified within 30 days. If the property owner(s) would like to contest the lien, they can do so pursuant to the new procedures within 60 days from notification of the lien. 

During this process, the property owner must have specific and factual information that was not available to the State of New Jersey at the time of the issuance of the lien, along with a list of many other items of description of the property. 

The agency has the right to deny the request for lack of information, or may decide to respond to the property owners request. During that time, with all of the information available, an administrators decision will be made and is final.

PM Environmental’s New Jersey staff can guide owner(s) through the process and assist with gathering the correct and pertinent information. PM’s LSRP team specializes in NJDEP Regulatory Compliance, Operations and Maintenance, Remedial System Construction and Specialty Environmental Mechanical Services. 

Publication Details
Date

February 19, 2016

Tags

Related Services

A Day in the Life of Adam Patton

PM Environmental’s Vice President sits down with us to provide a glimpse into his role, as well as reflect on how he got here.   Q: Name, Title, Location  I’m Adam Patton, Vice President. I’m based out of our Lansing office but travel between our Midwest locations based on client and project needs.   Q:…

Vapor Intrusion: Just the Facts

What is Vapor Intrusion? Vapor intrusion can occur in an area where various chemicals were not properly handled or disposed of and have seeped into the ground. Some culprits can be properties that were once gas stations, dry cleaners, or businesses that used industrial degreasers. Once in the ground, these chemicals can move through the…

A Day in the Life of John Hargraves

PM Environmental’s National Manager of Economic Incentive sits down with us to provide a glimpse into his to-do list, as well as share how he got to where he is now.   Q: Name, Title, Location  John Hargraves, National Manager, Brownfield and Economic Incentives, Chattanooga, TN and work throughout the other Midsouth offices.   Q:…